5 October: Lewis Close Reading

Objective:

I can improve my annotation skills and write to analyze a challenging text by exploring how the author uses rhetoric using textual evidence to support my claims (RI 1/2).


Entry Task:

As you come into class, prepare to play a round of Booket to focus on vocabulary list 2.


What’s Going On:

Today we will continue developing our close reading skills moving into the 21st century. Today we will be analyzing an essay written by Congressman John Lewis. The essay was written shortly before he passed and was published on the day of his death. For some background information on Lewis, we will watch this short video.


Based on the film, we will discuss how Lewis’ life work relates to our unit themes:

  • Interconnectedness & Power: When individuals unify, they collectively have more power to achieve goals than they otherwise would if they were working to achieve them alone.

  • Justice, Resistance, & Rebellion: Rebelling against the norm and resisting what is unjust, is ultimately necessary to stand up for what is right, even if one is alone in the fight.

  • Altruism & Selflessness: To be truly altruistic, one must think beyond themselves and outside of themselves, responding to what is in the best interest of others even to their own detriment.


We will continue by closely reading Lewis’ final essay, “Together You Can Redeem the Soul of Our Nation.” We have been practicing our annotation skills; another habit of strong readers is reading a text multiple times. Together we will do an initial reading using this audio. Follow along and record your initial reactions as you listen.


After reading through again, while annotating; use your annotations to complete your analytical summary using the guided CCC format.


Exit Task:

Turn your work in for feedback and grab a sticky note. Over the next few classes, we will overview the rhetorical analysis summaries you have completed for our unit texts. Use your sticky note to record any remaining questions you have about writing analytical summaries, CCC writing, or our unit themes. This sticky note will be your ticket out the door.